Digital Noise Photography http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk Night photography by Mark ONeill Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:57:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 47880348 Pictures at APO’s Exhibition http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2016/02/02/pictures-at-apos-exhibition/ Tue, 02 Feb 2016 23:56:11 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2441 Recently, a unique opportunity arose through the amazing people at Jelly for Reading’s local artists and young composers to come together to create a piece of music, commissioned by the Aldworth Philharmonic Orchestra. Inspired by the concept of Mussorgsky’s ‘Pictures at an exhibition’, each of the four composers would select a piece of visual artwork that would evoke a musical […]

The post Pictures at APO’s Exhibition appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Recently, a unique opportunity arose through the amazing people at Jelly for Reading’s local artists and young composers to come together to create a piece of music, commissioned by the Aldworth Philharmonic Orchestra. Inspired by the concept of Mussorgsky’s ‘Pictures at an exhibition’, each of the four composers would select a piece of visual artwork that would evoke a musical response from them. They were to be mentored through the process of writing the music, even receiving a workshop from world famous composer Sir Mark-Anthony Turnage CBE, before their final pieces were to be performed by the orchestra’s 80 musicians in the beautiful concert hall at Reading town hall.

Julie Simmond's 'On the wing'

Julie Simmond’s ‘On the wing’

The composers had been found through a competition masterminded by the APO and were aged between 12 and 18. One of the orchestra’s own cellists was also invited to contribute a piece, with professional composer Roger May responsible for the short movements that linked them all together. The works of Mark Andrew Webber, Julie Simmonds and Jim Attewell were selected by the competition winners at Jelly’s studios and my light painted series on the Holy Brook was chosen by Roger to represent the movements leading from one composition to another.

During the process, I found it difficult to imagine what the final performance would be like, and when in finally came in January 2016 after nine months of preparation, I have to say I underestimated the scale of the event. Listening to the performance was incredible and I was deeply touched by how much effort had gone into it. The music is now available for you to hear on the pictures at our exhibition website and the event has even been nominated for the ‘Event of the year‘ award by Alt Reading. Make sure you drop in and vote if you can.

Roger May used my work to represent Mussorgsky’s ‘promenades’, a series of short, themed movements, as the performance moves from one piece of work to another, with the winding course of the Holy brook leading the way through the music. I love his musical responses to my work and I will share them with you below, but I do recommend you listen to the work in its entirety on the Aldworth Philharmonic Orchestra’s Soundcloud page.

 

The post Pictures at APO’s Exhibition appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2441
Bash Aparan http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/10/30/monument-battle-bash-aparan/ Fri, 30 Oct 2015 16:20:08 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2409 To the north of the ancient town of Arapan, a monument to a pivotal battle and to the Armenian Genocide of 1915 was erected by architect Rafael Israeliyan in 1979. A massive stone structure, the striking asymmetric monument looks notably different on each face. From the north it appears brutally angular, contrasted by the elegant arches of the southern face.  It […]

The post Bash Aparan appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
To the north of the ancient town of Arapan, a monument to a pivotal battle and to the Armenian Genocide of 1915 was erected by architect Rafael Israeliyan in 1979. A massive stone structure, the striking asymmetric monument looks notably different on each face. From the north it appears brutally angular, contrasted by the elegant arches of the southern face.  It is a powerful location, dominated by the weather thrown over the 4 Km volcanic peak of Mt Aragats, just a few miles to the west.

Many terrible things are said to have happened during the Ottoman invasion of Armenia in world war one. This year marks the centenary of the 1915 Armenian genocide, where 1.5 million people are said to have lost their lives in a systematic extermination which continued for some time even after the war ended. The turning point came with vicious battles fought between the Turkish army and the army of the newly independent republic of Armenia. Whilst making a drive for Yerevan, the Ottoman forces were halted three hours from their objective by 1000 riflemen. After four days of intense battle, combined with other victories in the area, the Turks were driven back by the Armenians on the 29th May 1918.

 

The post Bash Aparan appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2409
Lake Reschen http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/10/30/lake-reschen/ Fri, 30 Oct 2015 14:41:06 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2395 High in the alps, near the borders of Austria, Switzerland and Italy is a large lake that might, at first glance seem perfectly natural. That is, until one sets eyes on the unusual spire of an old church piercing the waterline.  Legend has it that during winter, the bells of the drowned church in Reschensee/ Lago […]

The post Lake Reschen appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
High in the alps, near the borders of Austria, Switzerland and Italy is a large lake that might, at first glance seem perfectly natural. That is, until one sets eyes on the unusual spire of an old church piercing the waterline.  Legend has it that during winter, the bells of the drowned church in Reschensee/ Lago di Resia/ Lake Reschen, can mysteriously be heard ringing out through the valley. The bells were in fact removed before an Italian electricity company flooded the lake in the 1950s, swallowing the villages of Graun and Reschen in the process.

Reschensee is quite an Austrian sounding name and the initial confusion would stem from the South Tirol region’ s 20th century history. As part of the Austro-Hungarian empire the territory was offered to Italy by Britain as an incentive to join the first world war on the side of the Allies. In 1919 this became a reality and the autonomous provence was formed as we know it in 1929, although there was a brief period of German occupation from 1943-1945 when Italy surrendered during WWII.

Lake Reschen’s submerged church of Alt-Graun dates back to the 14th century. As can be seen in the image on the right, the nave was quite sizable but it was demolished, along with many of the villages’ other structures before the dam was completed in 1950, after ten troubled years of construction.

 

The post Lake Reschen appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2395
Garni Temple http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/10/30/garni-temple/ Fri, 30 Oct 2015 11:25:54 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2385 Tucked away in the hills to the south east of Yerevan, Armenia, is a magical gorge with hexagonal shaped protusions of rock. Overlooking the spectacle is the ancient pagan temple of Garni, a Hellenistic temple with a grand Greco-Roman colonnade, the only such example in Armenia.  Probably built in the 1st century AD, it is […]

The post Garni Temple appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Tucked away in the hills to the south east of Yerevan, Armenia, is a magical gorge with hexagonal shaped protusions of rock. Overlooking the spectacle is the ancient pagan temple of Garni, a Hellenistic temple with a grand Greco-Roman colonnade, the only such example in Armenia.  Probably built in the 1st century AD, it is thought to have been a temple to Mihr, the ancient Armenian Sun God.

Christianity swept across Armenia in the year 301 AD as the country became the first state to adopt it as an official religion. With that, the destruction of the country’s pagan sites began. The Garni Temple seems to have been the only structure that avoided this fate. It was then used as a summer house for the sister of king Tiridates III but from here on it’s history becomes obscure until it collapsed during an earthquake in 1679.

Historical interest in the temple grew in the 19th century and it was eventually reconstructed between 1969 and 1975. Coupled with the surrounding gorge, It has now become one of Armenia’s main tourist attractions.

We made the hour long drive at night only to find one of us had left a camera bag in a restaurant in Yerevan, complete with passport, memory cards etc…  As we were due to fly home the next day we thought it would be sensible to scrap the plan and try and locate it, which we did. I had to get just one while we were there though.

The post Garni Temple appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2385
Neuschwanstein Castle http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/09/15/neuschwanstein-castle/ Tue, 15 Sep 2015 19:03:24 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2230 Schloss, or Castle Neuschwanstein is possibly as close to a real ‘fairy tale’ castle as you can find. Tucked away in south west Bavaria in the foothills of the German Alps, the castle sits on a lump of rock beside a beautiful river gorge and waterfall near the historic town of Füssen. It has, understandably […]

The post Neuschwanstein Castle appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Schloss, or Castle Neuschwanstein is possibly as close to a real ‘fairy tale’ castle as you can find. Tucked away in south west Bavaria in the foothills of the German Alps, the castle sits on a lump of rock beside a beautiful river gorge and waterfall near the historic town of Füssen. It has, understandably become one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe with 1.3 million visitors per year.

The castle occupies the site of a middle aged castle, with another; Hohenschwangau Castle nestled on a hilltop below the site. By 1868, the old ruins were demolished and the foundation stone was laid in September 1869. Castles were no longer necessary for defensive purposes by this time but the Bavarian King Ludwig II, also known as the ‘fairytale King’ wanted the castle constructed regardless, and strived for perfection. Much of the castle is inspired by his fascination with Wagner, even the name, ‘New Swan Castle’ references one of his characters.

King Ludwig II spent so much of his time and money on the castle, yet the amazing structure was not even complete upon his death in 1886. The castle was promptly opened up to visitors and has featured in many films and is also the inspiration behind Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle.

 

 

The post Neuschwanstein Castle appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2230
Fort San Giorgio http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/09/13/fort-san-giorgio/ Sun, 13 Sep 2015 20:46:54 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2257 Fort San Giorgio is just one of countless fortifications along the Croatian coastline, built in the latter part of the 19th century when the city of Pula became the main Naval base and port for the Austrian empire. This relatively small fortification is situated on top of a hill near the centre of Pula and the local Cemetery. […]

The post Fort San Giorgio appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Fort San Giorgio is just one of countless fortifications along the Croatian coastline, built in the latter part of the 19th century when the city of Pula became the main Naval base and port for the Austrian empire. This relatively small fortification is situated on top of a hill near the centre of Pula and the local Cemetery. There’s also plenty of other places to explore nearby, the fort is only a few minutes walk from the stunning 2000 year old amphitheatre, Augustov Hram Temple, and inside another nearby fortress, the Historical and Maritime Museum of Istria.

In common with many of the Austrian fortifications, Fort San Giorgio has a round structure, some 35 metres across, built around a central courtyard with a cistern in the centre. A caponnier projects outwards at the entrance and two towers rise from within the courtyard, one for a spiral staircase and one presumably for a shell hoist. A small ditch surrounds the circular fort. Rumours have it that all the Austrian forts were connected by underground tunnels but there’s no evidence to support that here.

Today, the steel gate at the entrance lies wide open, inviting visitors to explore the fort, which is quite accessible inside. Most of the building appears to be in good structural condition, despite there being no first floor to stand on. If you carry on to the top of the staircase there are some pleasant, panoramic views of Pula to be enjoyed from the roof.

The post Fort San Giorgio appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2257
Road Trip! http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/09/12/road-trip/ Sat, 12 Sep 2015 23:42:56 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2313 Phew… Back home from an epic road trip across Europe to Croatia, having ticked off a total of ten countries along the way. We covered 2200+ miles and  stopped at some of Europe’s finest locations sampling some of the local food and drink, and when everybody had gone to bed I crept out with camera […]

The post Road Trip! appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Phew… Back home from an epic road trip across Europe to Croatia, having ticked off a total of ten countries along the way. We covered 2200+ miles and  stopped at some of Europe’s finest locations sampling some of the local food and drink, and when everybody had gone to bed I crept out with camera and tripod to bring back some images for you. Here’s a quick tease, hope you enjoy…

The post Road Trip! appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2313
Open for Art http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/06/27/open-for-art/ Sat, 27 Jun 2015 20:46:14 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=2015 Every year I seem to see some great art events going on in my home town of Reading, and I often think it would be a great experience to be involved with such a thing but by the time I realise what’s going on it’s far too late to participate! This year, I was collared by […]

The post Open for Art appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
Every year I seem to see some great art events going on in my home town of Reading, and I often think it would be a great experience to be involved with such a thing but by the time I realise what’s going on it’s far too late to participate! This year, I was collared by the friendly bunch at Jelly Studios well ahead of their next ‘Open for Art’ event, “A three-day Town Centre arts festival to showcase Reading’s hidden talent and creative industries” and I’m really glad they did, they are a top bunch, oozing knowledge, passion and drive. Meeting up to brainstorm ideas has been great fun and I’m sure every artist in Reading would benefit from popping in to say hello.

madeInReadingLogo1

The event runs from Friday the 3rd to Sunday the 5th of July and with it will land an invasion of local art. Twenty nine venues within Reading town centre have volunteered to host a trail of pieces from local artists on the streets, in shop windows, and in disused buildings. Along with the art trail, there are heritage trails, workshops, and fun events for everyone to participate in throughout the weekend, some of which require booking so it may be a good idea to get in early if you are interested. Open for Art also happens to coincide with Reading Arts Week at the Town Hall which will provide so many opportunities to introduce yourself to the local artistic community, many of whom happen to be extremely talented.

Maps of the locations are available for download in PDF form here, or you can drop in and pick up a hard copy from Jelly’s HQ on Jacksons Corner. Be sure to check their press release and the rest of their website for more information on how you can get involved.

My own installation, thanks to Jack the Landlord, will be at 10 Gun St; an empty unit with a good amount of window space right next door to the infamous Purple Turtle. I will be using the window to present large prints of Reading’s own lost river, the Holy Brook. The location couldn’t be better as the underground culvert carrying the Brook happens to run right underneath it’s garden! I hope to share some interesting views and reveal some of the Brook’s captivating history as it was buried underneath the expanding town.

I won’t reveal too much right now but I’m really happy with the way the project is coming together and can’t wait to see how it turns out.

The post Open for Art appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
2015
Tbilisi Loves You! http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/04/15/tbilisi-loves-you/ Wed, 15 Apr 2015 23:03:35 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=1970 I’m back from nine days in Georgia with Xiao Yang and wow, what a place. The country is so rich with amazing locations and we really indulged ourselves with many long days, which turned into nights, and then into day again. We spent half the trip in and around the capital, Tbilisi and then ventured […]

The post Tbilisi Loves You! appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
I’m back from nine days in Georgia with Xiao Yang and wow, what a place. The country is so rich with amazing locations and we really indulged ourselves with many long days, which turned into nights, and then into day again.

We spent half the trip in and around the capital, Tbilisi and then ventured into the mountains to the amazing town of Chiatura and got to ride on ‘Stain’s cable cars’. I really don’t know where to start with the images right now, it is going to take a long time for both my computer and my brain to digest all this information, but to keep things flowing, here’s a small selection of what we got to shoot whilst we were out there.





The post Tbilisi Loves You! appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
1970
The Knog Qudos http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/2015/03/27/knog-qudos/ Fri, 27 Mar 2015 23:12:08 +0000 http://digitalnoisephotography.co.uk/?p=1807 I first looked at purchasing one of these lights to add to my ever growing Gopro accessory pile, but the more I thought about it, the more uses I could find for it. Somehow it found it’s way into my lighting bag (then multiplied), and I’ve been very impressed with what it can do. The Qudos […]

The post The Knog Qudos appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
I first looked at purchasing one of these lights to add to my ever growing Gopro accessory pile, but the more I thought about it, the more uses I could find for it. Somehow it found it’s way into my lighting bag (then multiplied), and I’ve been very impressed with what it can do.

The Qudos is made by Knog, an Australian Cycling company; designed to sit alongside a Gopro and thus compatible with it’s mounting system. The shell is of chunky aluminium and is essentially a heat sink for it’s face full of three ultra-bright Cree LEDs, pumping out a claimed 400 lumen output which makes it quite powerful, especially for it’s size. Five different lighting modes are available, offering some control over the intensity and spread. The unit is powered by it’s own removable 1000 mAh lithium polymer battery which features it’s own micro USB charging socket and LED indicator. The light is available in either silver or black. Naturally, I chose black and once I’d already bought it I remembered the Qudos has a neat party trick.

As it’s designed to go everywhere your gopro does, the Qudos is waterproof to 40 metres. This boosts it’s versatility somewhat. It’s suitable for diving deeper than most average divers would ever go.

Sold in a nice tin, the Qudos comes packaged with one battery and a tidy little micro USB cable to charge it. There are two mounting screws; one long and one short. A twin mount to attach the light alongside a Gopro, and a handy little hotshoe mount for a DSLR.

Qudos Accessories

I’d daydreamed about a light that was waterproof, and rugged enough to cope with the abuse it would inevitably receive on location, in mines, sewers and such. I’m a big fan of Gopro’s ingenious mounting system, so something I could integrate with that would be extremely useful… Then this turned up.

The Qudos is easily mounted on a tripod, caving helmet, head strap, pole, or even my dog. It’s already had good use as a bicycle light in the winter evenings and will be useful on a camera hot shoe to help with framing in low light. I keep thinking of ways I can use it.

It’s got a good, solid feel in the hand, the power button feels of the same quality to that of the Gopro which makes a nice touch. The clip which holds the back door in place has a nice action and bestows a sense of reliability.

Thanks to the batteries’ own micro USB socket I can charge the lights on the go with a USB power bank.

The daylight balanced 5500K colour temperature appears slightly warmer to the eye than most LEDs, and a touch more appealing. There’s a bit of a green tint which is easily removed when shooting Raw, no more than any other LED light.

The Qudos can currently be purchased for £89.99 from London Camera Exchange

This is what Marley got up to with the lights in the back garden.

Marley Light Dog

Marley LP

Here’s a handful of other images I’ve created with the Qudos in the short time I’ve had them…

Station Approach

GR1

G Res

The post The Knog Qudos appeared first on Digital Noise Photography.

]]>
1807